Spotlight on Two Established and Three New Venues

Million Happy Endings

1_21-blog-6

The ever changing mainland has numerous welcoming and interesting spots. One such place is Cafe Klaus, in Patagonia on the Atoll. “A roadside joint and arts venue on Route 1 in the South Western Heterocera Atoll region. A place to relax with friends in surroundings vaguely evocative of the colonial era, enjoy a morning coffee, a sundowner or cocktails and jazz on the verandah.” Cafe Klaus is always open.

1-_21-blog-5

Regulars to the Sundowners Events often show up via one of a variety of rides, (I like to ride a scooter to and from). Sometimes there are spontaneous road trips to check out some new development of interest.

“Sundowners is served on Mondays and Thursdays from 3 to 4pm (SLT). Do drop in to enjoy the evening light, sip a cocktail and engage in casual conversation as the shadows grow longer. Klaus will be around to make you welcome and…

View original post 336 more words

Simploring 2017 (3) God’s own county – The Yorkshire Dales

Diomita and Jenny Maurer's Blog

Saturday, January 14th, I went simploring. I followed a landmark that I found in someone’s profile and it turns out to be a real nice simploring tour. I went to The Yorkshire Dales. The LM description says about it: “The Yorkshire Dales are situated in the historic county of Yorkshire, UK. This beautiful rural countryside has been recreated for SL and is ideal for photos, time out and romance. Get a feel for Yorkshire heritage and enjoy the simple life.”20170114-the-yorkshire-dales_021
Upon your arrival you’ll get a notecard that introduces you to the creator, PinkRayne, her background growing up in UK and spending many hours with her family in the Yorkshire Dales, and in particular in Malhamdale. She brought some of it’s beauty to Second Life. “Malhamdale consists of a tiny village and vast amounts of stunning countryside including a cove, tarn and various waterfalls. I…

View original post 223 more words

A second helping of Hell’s Heaven in Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World

“Stay awhile,” Snoob (SnoobJohnson) and his partner, Mila (Mila Maesar) say in greeting to visitors to their homestead region, The Hell’s Heaven 2.0. “Let  this world  refresh your soul andmelt your worries away …  Explore this cloudy world of changing scenery and enjoy your stay!”It’s a warm invitation, and there is much to enjoy within the region, which has been beautifully created by Snoob, with touches inspired by Mila to offer photographers and explorers alike with a visual treat – an anyone who has looked at the Flickr group for the region will only be too aware.

The Hell’s Heaven 2.0This is a land of two distinct parts. To the west sit low-lying marshlands, ankle-deep in water and carpeted in long reeds and grasses through which a water-hugging mist drifts.  Scattered over this lay dilapidated shacks and cabins, their floors flooded and wooden walls slowly rotting, submerged wooden walkways running from nowhere to nowhere outside. Wrecks of cars and pick-ups complete the scenery, together with a couple of rowing boats and the rusting body of an old airboat….

Source: A second helping of Hell’s Heaven in Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World

ragVR: imagination and expression in Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World

RAG Randt is a content creator and designer who is perhaps best known for his work with MadPea, having worked on many of their games over the years. However, he recently departed the MadPea team to focus on his own work, and as we’ve been friends for several years, having worked closely on a project together, I was delighted to receive an invitation from him to see what he’s been up to within the region he’s been working on for the past few months.

“I’ve been putting together a portfolio site,” he explained as I arrived next to a DC3 sitting at the edge of a long runway, a fitting arrival point for visitors to his island. “Some of it is still under construction, but I’ve opened it to the public.” Called ragVR, the region is a veritable tour-de-force in RAG’s skills as a scripter, creator, builder and environment designer – and makes for a completely engaging visit.

From the airfield landing point, a flight of steps leads visitors to the stunning Art Deco frontage of an elevator tower rising above the sheer cliff face against which it is built. Two kiosks stand before the doors to the tower, one of which invites visitors to click it, thus getting one into the habit of touching similar kiosks across the region to obtain information on the various locations one can visit. The second kiosk provides background information on RAG himself and the region, and should be read…

Source: ragVR: imagination and expression in Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World

The Sagan Planetarium in Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World

It’s no secret that I love space exploration and astronomy – hence my Space Sunday series. Both are subjects which fit wonderfully into the niche of virtual worlds and virtual spaces, so I’m always on the look out from locations expressing either in-world. It therefore came as complete surprise to learn about the Sagan Planetarium  courtesy of a Tweet and blog post by Ricco Saenz; so much so that I had to clear all other plans for region visits and move it to the top of my list of places to visit.The planetarium – obviously named after one of the 20th century’s greatest intellects, the late astronomer and astrophysicist Carl Sagan – is the work of Josh Nitschke and is frankly a must-see visit, whatever your level of interest in astronomy and space exploration. The visitor spaces are split into four areas: the entrance lobby (I’ve used this as the landing point in the SLurls in this article), the Exhibition Hall, the main skydome and an outdoor orrery.

Continue reading “The Sagan Planetarium in Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World”

Nagare no Shimajima, Restless Times, Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World

In October 2013, I visited Nagare, the home of the Blue Lotus Clan, offering both a place to visit and the opportunity for those who enjoy the art of traditional Japanese katana, nagi and short blades traditional fighting to join the clan’s C:SI (Combat Samurai Islands system) dojo. At that time, Nagare occupied a quarter region parcel on Southern Cross. A lot has changed since then, and thanks to a nudge by Loverdag, I realised it was high time I revisited.

Continue reading “Nagare no Shimajima, Restless Times, Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World”

Going away with Captain Nemo in Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World

Back in 2015 I wrote about the merfolk of Fanci’s Deep, who were holding a week of underwater activities to encourage folk to explore their undersea community, centred around the four regions of Fanci’s Deep. These form a part of the Blake Deeps, covering roughly 13 regions to the east of Blake Sea and south of  Blake’s Passage as it cuts its way westward from Blake Sea to Second Norway.Recently, Caitlyn and I have been spending time within the Deeps, and so I felt a further blog post was overdue on their secrets.

Continue reading “Going away with Captain Nemo in Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World”

Yhorm: a stunning new role-play location in Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World

It stands like one might imagine Tolkien’s Minas Ithil might have looked before Gondor’s fading might failed it, and it fell into corruption as Minas Morgul. Surrounded by snow-capped mountains, their flanks cold and hard, the old city of Vyhorm rises into the darkening sky, tier upon tier to a final crowning citadel.Designed by Stark Osterham (of Insilico fame), the city forms a part of a new role-play environment – Yhorm – he is designing and building with his Second Life partner, Cailin Beorn. Although not officially opening until around mid-January 2017, Caitlyn and I had the opportunity to tour the city and the region thanks to our resident Sim Detective, Shakespeare (SkinnyNilla), who passed on news about the region. Our visit also gave me the chance to chat with Cailin and Stark about Yhorm.

Continue reading “Yhorm: a stunning new role-play location in Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World”

A Painter’s Link in Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World

I’ve always enjoyed Silvermoon Fairey’s region designs in Second Life since I first visited  Dawn of Radiance 2013 (see here, here, and here for some past visits). So I was a little surprised to find an LM sitting in inventory for A Painter’s Link, another of her creations, passed on to me by Silvana Casini but which has been languishing without attention – my apologies to both Silvana and Silvermoon for the oversight.When blogging about Second Life rural scenes, it’s easy to turn to the term “pastoral” as a description, when there is actually little sign of grazing by cattle or sheep or anything else. However, with A Painter’s Link, the word is appropriate: sheep do indeed safely graze under the watchful eye of a shepherd, while further afield in the gently undulating landscape, horses can be found grazing on the grasslands.

That said, attempts to describe the region is words are unlikely to do A Painter’s Link justice; this is a place which should be visited to be truly appreciated. Caught in a mix of  Spring’s warm greens and Autumn’s gold and red, the region presents a world of rustic cottages, old ruins, rolling fields, and country folk of a seemingly bygone era going about their work. Only the presence of a bicycle, an upright telephone and a gramophone, with its great horned speaker indicate the era is likely more recent than the clothing worn by the locals might otherwise suggest….

Source: A Painter’s Link in Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World

Silvermoon’s snowy magic in Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World

On December 26th, I wrote about Silvermoon Fairey’s A Painter’s Link, noting the over it she has created a seasonal setting, 50 Words For Snow. The latter is actually one of two wintry designs Silvermoon is offering visitors, the other being December Will Be Magic Again. While separated by teleport, both of these settings in many ways complement one another, giving the appearance of being different parts of the same countryside.Visitors arriving at, or teleporting to, 50 Words For Snow arrive atop a rocky plateau over which trees denuded of their leaves raise bare branches to the sky, as if trying to ward off the falling snow. Foxes, raccoons and deer wander among the tree trunks, while a path meanders idly through the woodland, enticing the traveller to follow its winding course. However, the keen-eyed may also spot a path close to hand, switchbacking its way down to lower ground.

Those who follow this route may find their way through fir trees and snow to a large house lit from without and within, where kitties rule the roost and wood fires burn bright in hearth and stove. Sitting diagonally opposite the house, in the north-east corner of the region sits a smaller lodge, also under gently falling snow, and with a frozen pond close to hand. Between these two lie opportunities for walking or sitting beside another ice-sheathed pond, a vista of snow-covered land and blanketed hills stretching to the horizon and caught in the soft glow of a lowering Sun….

Source: Silvermoon’s snowy magic in Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World

Resting in Fall Trace in Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World

In November, Caitlyn and I dropped in to Winter Trace, one of the three seasonal Trace regions in Second Life designed by Kylie Jaxxon and Elvira Kytori – see my article here. At the time of writing, I noted that we had yet to visit Fall Trace, so having spent some time bouncing around wintry regions, we decided to spend a lazy Monday taking a look.As the name suggests, Fall Trace offers an autumnal look and feel, with Eliva taking the lead in the design, and Gnaaah Xeltentat providing additional support. The presentation is that of a low-lying marshland, perhaps at the estuary of a slow-flowing river. The land is flat and reedy, much of it under a shallow covering water, across which trees coloured in autumn’s golden hues stand sentinel.

Continue reading “Resting in Fall Trace in Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World”

Discovering 1920s New York in Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World

“I’d been considering doing a 1920’s New York Project for a long time, wanted to make sure I had the time and resources for a project this big,” Jogi Schultz (yogijo) – “Mr. S” to the folk in his neighbourhood – told me as we emerged from the subway station into the world of New York in the mid-1920s, as modelled by his 1920s New York Project.As we stood at the roadside, a few cars parked at the kerb, he continued, “New York City has been my favourite city since I was a kid.  There is so much history here, even in the buildings themselves.  And it’s so diverse in what it has to offer.”I’d first come across the project via Annie Brightstar. Her article was enough to pique my curiosity and encourage me to hop over to take a look – and that encouraged me to contact Jogi to find out more.

 

1920s New York Project: the landing point, model on the Continue reading “Discovering 1920s New York in Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World”

Boarding the Arctic Express in Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World

Inspired by the 1985 children’s classic, The Polar Express, written and illustrated by Chris Van Allsburg, the DRD Arctic Express, built by sisters Jaimy Hancroft and Ewoyn Swords, is currently being showcased in its own region for the holiday season. As the region is a venue for the Lab’s Jolly Holiday Crawl, and DRD is the subject of segment #42 of the Drax Files World Makers; (see my review here), Caitlyn and I took time out on a Friday afternoon to pay it a visit.

The express sits to one side of a snow-bound landscape under an overcast sky, patiently awaiting passengers to climb the steps and board the carriages. Those who do will find there’s considerable comfort to be had within. For example, the First Class saloon located immediately behind the engine and its tender, provides soft sofas and armchairs in which to relax, with decorated Christmas trees offering a seasonal sparkle, while cookies and hot chocolate are on hand to ward off the cold.

Behind this sits the dining car, where the tables are set for those seeking a filling repast – just take a seat and discover for yourself!  Travel further back through the train, and the first class carriage awaits, and behind it, the club car. The latter offers a range of alcoholic beverages for those seeking something with a little more edge than hot chocolate to help them recover from the cold air outside. Bringing up the rear of the train are the standard and third class carriages….

Source: Boarding the Arctic Express in Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World

Ziki Questi’s Blog: The Plain of Jars

On the hot, arid ground on the sim Tefa of Sand, a mysterious sight awaits: hundreds of massive stone urns and ewers spread over the ground, enhanced only by some struggling grasses and a couple of trees. This location, The Plain of Jars, a creation by Fitch Lekvoda, mirrors a real life site by the same name in central Laos on the Xiangkhouang Plateau, which may have been a prehistoric burial ground.

Of the inworld location, Fitch says, “Some recall the legend of the giant king’s victory banquet, believing the jars to be the leftover alcohol vessels from that banquet. Others think of a more mundane purpose, to collect rain water for passing caravans…” Whatever their purpose, the jars form a curiously beautiful and mesmerizing landscape. The thorough explorer will discover that there’s more to the build that what’s immediately visible: a hidden world exists below the plain, one filed with additional sights and discoveries (middle image). A couple of teleport points are available to reach these tunnels that snake about underground. Contributions toward the support of The Plain of Jars may be left at the landing point.

Source: Ziki Questi’s Blog: The Plain of Jars

A trip to Alki’s North Pole in Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World

“Just for fun, Zoidyn and I have built a light-hearted north pole area over Alki,” Alana Onyett informed me whilst chatting recently. “We had a little dance there, so the elves are a little busy cleaning up, poor things! But we hope you and Caitlyn can come over in your leisure time and relax. We’ll have the build up until the end of December.”

Continue reading “A trip to Alki’s North Pole in Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World”

Exploring Mineral Ridge in Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World

In the 1930s, Mineral Ridge was once a wealthy, booming mining town, its fortune drawn from the precious secrets hidden within the rocks of the high plateaus on which it sits. But, as the saying goes, nothing lasts forever. Today Mineral Ridge sits as a place well past its heyday, fading and rusting under the sun, a curio for tourists to come and visit, and a place where the dispossessed and – maybe – those on the wrong side of the law – can find a place where they can settle or hide.

Or that’s how you might interpret the back story to this Full region, designed as a group effort principally by Norman Dobler, Aiden Cauldron, and thejunkyard. It’s a relatively new addition to Second Life, but one which is both atmospheric and which makes good use of the available space to create a scenic environment offers plenty of space for exploration as well as reflecting the theme of a once-wealthy mining town now well past its heyday.

On the highest plateau of this rugged place, sits part of the town: grand houses  – including a villa of distinctly Tuscan looks – doubtless built by those who gained their fortune out of the mines below, but which have all seen better days. Some appear deserted, other still occupied – although whether by the original owners is perhaps open to question….

Source: Exploring Mineral Ridge in Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World

Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World | Second Life, virtual worlds and virtual reality

In 2014 I, like many other Second Life users, paid my first visit to Frisland, the region designed by Charlie Namiboo, Anna Barzane and Frislanda “Fris” Ferraris which was based on the phantom island that appeared on virtually all of the maps of the North Atlantic from the 1560s through the 1660s.

The region became an instant hit with visitors, changing its face to match the seasons, and drawing people back time and time again. So much so, that when it did finally come time to say goodbye, it was obvious many would miss it.Fris’ Land, LiebeIt seems that Charlie and Fris also found it hard to leave their beloved creation behind, because they’ve just opened up Fris’ Land.

While in no any way intended to be a replica of their original vision, it nevertheless offers those of us who miss Frisland with the opportunity to recapture memories of its wintertime look…

Source: Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World | Second Life, virtual worlds and virtual reality

Ashemi: oriental neon in Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World

Over the weekend of November 26th/27th, Caitlyn and I were delighted to receive an invitation from Shaman Nitely to visit Ashemi, a new homestead region he has designed together with Ime and Jay Poplin (Jayshamime). Having been enthralled by their work with Imesha back at the start of 2016 (see my article here), we were only to pleased to accept and hop across.

Continue reading “Ashemi: oriental neon in Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World”

A journey to Let It Snow! in Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World

For the last two years, a regular seasonal destination for the Pey household has been Milly Sharple’s Let It Snow!, and I’m happy to say that it is once again back, and Caitlyn and I donned our woollies and our boots to explore the delights that artist Milly Sharple has again cooked up to help people into the Christmas mood.

Continue reading “A journey to Let It Snow! in Second Life | Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World”