Weather Photographer of the Year capture rare and dramatic meteorological phenomena in photos — Quartz

Climate change has created a new niche in photography. The Royal Photographic Society and Royal Meteorological Society in the UK announced the very first Weather Photographer of the Year awards on Sept. 10, and released dramatic images of rare weather phenomena.In over 800 submissions of supercell thunderstorms, Arctic diamond dust, and polar stratospheric clouds, the jury of photographers, editors, and a BBC weatherman has picked out the best to show us the serene beauty and power of mother earth….

 

Source: Weather Photographer of the Year capture rare and dramatic meteorological phenomena in photos — Quartz

How the Federal Duck Stamp painting contest launched in 1949 gained a cult following in America today — Quartz

For actors it’s the Oscar, for musicians it’s the Grammy, but for wildlife artists it is the federal Duck Stamp Contest. The US Fish and Wildlife Service on Sept. 10 once again chose a winner for a competition where artists each year frantically paint ducks, geese and swans for the sole hope of gracing a stamp.

Signed into law by president Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1934 as a way to fund wetland conservation, the Duck Stamp is a federally issued $25 sticker that sportsmen are required to paste onto their hunting licenses if they wish to shoot waterfowl. Since 1949 the Fish and Wildlife Service has held a contest for anyone over 18 to design the next year’s Duck Stamp. Some 200 people, enthusiasts of art, birds, conservation and hunting, enter the contest, attempting to paint the perfect duck (or goose). A panel of five art, waterfowl and stamp authorities evaluate each 7″ by 10″ entry based on the accuracy of the bird, its habitat and composition and whether it’s suitable to be shrunken into a 1.75″x 1.5″ stamp.

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Eight of the world’s most unusual libraries — Quartz

For dedicated readers, all a library needs to be exciting are some well-stocked shelves of books. But as Denmark’s award-winning new “citizen space” shows, libraries can come in all kinds of creative and unusual forms. Here are eight libraries from around the world sure to intrigue bookworms.

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Monkey selfie Naruto: If a monkey snaps a selfie, does he own the rights to his own photograph? — Quartz

SAY BANANAS!

If a monkey snaps a selfie, does he own the rights to his own photograph?

If a monkey takes a selfie in the forest, and no one is around to see it, does he make money? (Wikimedia Commons… or is it?)SHAREWRITTEN BYJustin Marceau6 hours agoA few years ago in an Indonesian forest, a crested macaque monkey named Naruto picked up an unattended camera and took several photos of himself. The resulting monkey selfies have become the center of a debate concerning the overlap of intellectual property law and animal rights.

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US National Parks at 100: Stunning photos showcase 100 years of American parks and summer road trips — Quartz

The US National Park Service turns 100 today, Aug. 25. To commemorate the milestone, one of the oldest and most important museums of photography is hosting a stunning show in its honor.

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Google (GOOG) is working on a way for artificial intelligence to compress your photos, just like on HBO’s Silicon Valley — Quartz

It’s not middle-out compression, but it’s the next best thing.

Researchers at Google are working on a way to use neural networks, the building blocks of modern artificial intelligence, to make our picture files smaller without sacrificing quality. To consumers, smaller files means more available space on phones, tablets, and computers, but for tech companies like Google that offer unlimited photo storage, smaller photos could reduce server load, power consumption, and improve transfer speeds. This sort of idea has made its way into pop culture thanks to HBO’s Silicon Valley, where the fictional compression startup Pied Piper uses neural networks to optimize how they shrink files. (Dropbox has actually used the start-up’s middle-out idea for its own photo compression.)

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Happy World Photo Day!

Happy World Photo Day! Read on about this awesome day and if you are inclined visit the official website for this movement: www.worldphotoday.com and we invite you to upload a photo to the Kultivate Magazine’s Flickr site in honor of this special day!

WORLD PHOTO DAY?

World Photo Day is an international photography event on August 19th that celebrates the passion for photography in our communities.In a world where millions of pictures are uploaded every minute, World Photo Day is inspiring thousands of photographers across the planet to share a single photo with a simple purpose: to share their world with the world.

From everyday life to incredible landscapes, our global gallery is an evolving mosaic of images captured by photographers of all skills levels living in a diverse range of countries and cultures.

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The New York Public Library’s new Twitter bot matches emoji with vintage photos from its digital archives — Quartz

Some Twitter bots are spammy and obnoxious, with eggs for profile images and misspelled suggestions of ways to get rich quick. But not all Twitter bots are bad. Some are downright brilliant. And some, like the New York Public Library’s new emoji bot, are simply delightful.

Tweet an emoji at the library bot, and it replies just about instantly with a related image from the New York Public Library’s digital archives. A crying cat face emoji, for instance, might turn up a photo of adorable kittens….

Source: The New York Public Library’s new Twitter bot matches emoji with vintage photos from its digital archives — Quartz

Want to be happier at work? Don’t quit your job–get a creative side hustle — Quartz

A lot of people want to write novels, exhibit their paintings in a gallery or play in a band. But the frustrating reality is that it’s very difficult to make a living on art alone. I have many creatively inclined friends who bemoan the fact that they’ve had to settle for a job that met the needs of the market rather than their own souls.

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HBO’s “Game of Thrones” is getting a North America concert tour with composer Ramin Djawadi — Quartz

Music is coming.

Game of Thrones won’t come back to television until next summer, but there’s something to whet your appetite in the mean time. The HBO show’s composer Ramin Djawadi and a full orchestra will tour the US and Canada early next year, performing tracks from the show as part of an “immersive music and visual experience.”

The tour, which starts in Feb. 2017, will hit 25 US cities, including New York, Boston, Chicago, and LA, as well as Canadian cities Montreal, Toronto, and Vancouver. You can see the full list of cities and dates here. Live concert company Live Nation is producing and promoting the tour. Tickets go on sale this Saturday (Aug. 13).

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MIT researchers developed Interactive Dynamic Video that lets people interact with objects in a video — Quartz

Videos are a great medium for audio-visual experiences but interacting with characters and objects behind the screen has been a fantasy—until now.Researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) have found a way to let people reach in and push, pull, poke, and prod objects in videos. Going a step beyond augmented reality, the Interactive Dynamic Video (IDV) technique captures video with a traditional camera.

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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child launches worldwide to raving reviews — Quartz

The latest story about the world’s favorite boy wizard launched today.

Fans eagerly lined up to get their hands on Harry Potter and the Cursed Child–Parts I and II, a play set 19 years from where the seventh and final volume of the magical saga last left off. The script is the most pre-ordered book of the year, both in print and on Kindle.

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Google’s new Arts & Culture app brings the world’s art, virtual tours and more to your smartphone | TechCrunch

Experiencing the world’s art just got a little easier, thanks to Google’s newly launched Arts & Culture application which puts works of art from over a thousand museums across 70 countries into the palm of your hand. But the app goes beyond offering only static images and text – instead, it now offers tools to search art works by any keyword, browse by color, as well as see an artists’ works evolve over time. It even supports 360-degree virtual tours, which you can view in Google Cardboard, and an “Shazam for art”-like feature that will identify the painting in your camera’s viewfinder.

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A quadcopter drone developed by McGill University computer scientists can make surprisingly accurate dot pictures of people. — Quartz

Scientists at McGill University have developed a robot that could conceivably rank as one of the world’s great artists. Well, sort of.The team of scientists has written complex algorithms that allow a small quadcopter drone to fly in front of a canvas and to paint on it using daubs of ink. The process is called stippling and resembles the so-called hedcut portrait illustrations that were once used extensively by newspapers like the Wall Street Journal.

http://qz.com/730048

The drone works in conjunction with a computer that transmits directions on how to fly near the canvas, and uses motion capture sensors to precisely know its position. When it is in a location where a dot should be, the drone flies forward and gently daubs a spot of ink on the canvas. As you can see in the video, it’s remarkably precise. So far, it has managed to paint pictures of computer scientist Alan Turing and actress Grace Kelly.

Next up is a far more complicated version of a Japanese wave painting. After that, the Sistine Chapel?

Source: A quadcopter drone developed by McGill University computer scientists can make surprisingly accurate dot pictures of people. — Quartz

Sotheby’s to Sell David Bowie’s Art and Furniture Collection – The New York Times

LONDON — Around 400 pieces from David Bowie’s private art and furniture collection, including work by Marcel Duchamp, Henry Moore, Damien Hirst and Jean-Michel Basquiat, will go on sale at Sotheby’s here in November. The sale will be preceded by a three-week exhibition from July 20 to Aug. 9; the exhibition will then travel to Los Angeles, New York and Hong Kong.

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eMusic’s new owner TriPlay launches eStories, a new audiobook service | TechCrunch

eMusic, the veteran digital music company that was acquired in 2015 by Israeli media startup TriPlay, is expanding its horizons. Today the company is launching eStories, an audiobook service that will offer 80,000 titles at a cost of $11.95 per title to use, plus 33 percent off additional purchases.The service aims to compete with the likes of Audible, which is owned by Amazon and dominates the market, which is estimated to be at around 55 million users of audiobooks globally today. As a point of comparison, Audible has more titles — 250,000 — but costs $14.95 for one title per month, with a 30 percent discount on further titles (whose price can be higher or lower than $14.95).

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NVIDIA releases its own VR game ‘Funhouse’ to the masses through Steam | TechCrunch

As of this morning, NVIDIA is in the game publishing business. In its own weird, roundabout sort of way. The company has pushed its first title out to Steam, offering players seven mini-games under the Funhouse umbrella (with a total of ten planned for eventual roll out). But while the Funhouse is as fully playable as one would expect from a Steam-distributed title, it is as much a showcase for the chipmaker’s in-game technologies as it is a proper game.That’s not to say it’s not fun. It is. It’s pretty much exactly as engaging an experience as you would expect from a septet of carnival-style VR mini-games. You whack moles, you blast balloons above clown heads with a pair of squirt guns, you break inexpensive dishware by hurling soccer balls. If you’ve spent any time in or around a boardwalk, you pretty much get the deal here.

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Watch the world’s largest orchestra—7548 musicians—assemble in a field in Frankfurt to play together. — Quartz

A new world record has just been set for the largest orchestra ever assembled. As you’ll see in the video above, 7,548 musicians were brought together in a soccer field in Frankfurt to perform together, at the same time. The previous record was reached in Brisbane, Australia in 2013 when 7,224 musicians played together for at least five minutes.

http://qz.com/729230

Source: Watch the world’s largest orchestra—7548 musicians—assemble in a field in Frankfurt to play together. — Quartz

XYZprinting releases a $50 3D printing pen | TechCrunch

Probably could have seen this one coming from a mile away. XYZprinting, the Taiwanese company that’s made a name for itself with its user-friendly and reasonably priced da Vinci line, is branching out into the free-drawing 3D pen space popularized by the Wobbleworks, the company behind the 3Doodler.

The simply named da Vinci 3D Pen features push-button in-air drawing, using PLA plastic filament (available in 11 colors through the company). The wired extrusion device is available now through Amazon, priced at $50, which puts it at about half the price of the 3Doodler’s current standard offering and on-par with the pricing of its kid-focused Start pen.The company is also adding another product to its already robust printing portfolio. The da Vinci Jr. 1.0 3-in-1 brings laser scanning and optional engraving to XYZ’s line of entry-level 3D printers. The scanning functionality is able to capture resolutions down to 0.25mm — that comes with the device’s $550 starting price. Engraving will run an additional $200.Both new products are available now.

Source: XYZprinting releases a $50 3D printing pen | TechCrunch