Discussing architecture in SL (part 2 of 2): the quest for diversity

second sighting

In the first part of this discussion on architecture in Second Life, inspired by my conversations with Cain Maven, from Maven Homes and Quantum Luxury Homes, I tried to examine the relationship that the design of virtual buildings has with the atomic world. The references that I have mentioned, nonetheless, were all to a certain kind of RL architecture: the one that flourishes in the US mainstream (even if inspired in some European traditions, such as the English, French or German ones). Mea culpa: I’m not even American, but I realize that the United States is the main reference for the majority of the SL community. Still, if one looks around, there are a number of examples of other cultural backgrounds in the community.

Marrakesh Riad by Barnesworth Anubis: a Moroccan riad with rooms around a garden or patio Marrakesh Riad by Barnesworth Anubis: a Moroccan riad with rooms around a garden or patio

I think that one of the most exciting characteristics…

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Discussing architecture in SL (part 1 of 2): how it relates to the atomic world

second sighting

Sergio Botha's Lyon House: a waterfall incorporated to the project Sergio Botha’s Lyon House: a waterfall incorporated to the project

As a consequence of a photo contest that I have recently won (yes, I am proud of it!*), I have got to better know Cain Maven, architect and house builder in Second Life, and engaged with him in a discussion on how the community of bloggers have been writing about architecture in SL. Mostly, I would say, we can now see blogs that focus on consuming, on buying and decorating, like some sessions in magazines that list items that “would be perfect in your home”. In contrast, the sources for a more substantial reflection on architecture in SL seem to have been shrinking or fully disappearing.

Botha's Lyon house: straight lines rule Botha’s Lyon house from above: straight lines rule

I don’t think one has to be a specialist in order to discuss architecture in SL. What I have in mind is a reflection on how…

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La Coupole by Maven Homes – Exclusively in Windlight Magazine

Reven Rosca, Windlight Magazine’s new home and garden contributor, makes her debut with this great article on Cain Maven’s new home, La Coupole:

Cain Maven, of Maven Homes and Quantum Luxury Homes, kindly offered Windlight magazine an exclusive preview of his new house, scheduled for release the coming weekend. While very different from what I have seen from his hands before, “La Coupole” is also unmistakably Mavenesque.

La Coupole doesn’t only have several of the features that define Maven homes. It also carries Maven’s fingerprints in itself: The way it’s modeled, the elegant perfection in his texturing, and some surprising twists. The name itself bears evidence of such.

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A Renaissance sculpture that fell off the New York Met museum’s wall looks perfect again – Quartz


After eight years in the repair shop, the Metropolitan Museum of Art announced yesterday (April 5) that a treasured Renaissance sculpture that had fallen off its wall has been fully restored and is back on view.

In July of 2008, Saint Michael the Archangel, a late 15th-century blue and white glazed terracotta relief by Andrea della Robbia came loose from its spot above the doorway of the Met’s European Sculpture and Decorative Arts Galleries, fell, and broke to pieces. No one was hurt in the freak accident, which happened while the museum was closed, but it caused the 145-year-old New York institution to inspect the stability of its wall mounts and pedestals….

Source: A Renaissance sculpture that fell off the New York Met museum’s wall looks perfect again – Quartz

Windlight Magazine March 2016 Issue is Now Published!

The March 2016 Issue of Windlight Magazine is now published and available! You can find the magazine in world at our many kiosks or you can click the cover below to read the issue online. This issue features Betty Tureaud, Eliza Wierwight’s Patron Banyon House Edition, Elysium Cabaret, Zib Scaggs, Storybook Art, Ethnographia Island, Telrunya, and more roleplay tips! Very special thank you to the Windlight Contributors for this issue: Dawnbeam Dreamscape, Inara Pey, Eleseren Brianna, Ilyra Chardin, Vee Tammas, Kamille Kamala, and John. We would also like to thank Betty Tureaud for her amazing cover art for this issue.

Singapore wants to 3D print skyscrapers – Quartz

In the future, constructing skyscrapers may be as simple as following the instructions on a Lego model—albeit on a much grander scale.The city-state of Singapore has invested S$150 million (roughly $100 million) into the Singapore Centre for 3D Printing at Nanyang Technological University to test out 3D printing concrete blocks on a large scale.

According to 3DPrint, the school is looking into building new printers to create the blocks. “In the area of housing there are quite big challenges,” Chua Chee Kai, the center’s director, told 3DPrint. “There is no assistance of 3D printers and no availability of printable concrete. We have to develop all this from scratch….”

Source: Singapore wants to 3D print skyscrapers – Quartz

Photos: The Art Institute of Chicago has perfectly recreated Van Gogh’s bedroom, and it’s for rent on Airbnb – Quartz

Chicago artists have recreated Vincent Van Gogh’s famous bedroom in Arles, France and put it up for rent on Airbnb. For $10 per night, you can sleep in a cozy wood-framed bedroom and imagine that you too are a mentally fragile genius with a troubled relationship to Paul Gauguin….

Source: Photos: The Art Institute of Chicago has perfectly recreated Van Gogh’s bedroom, and it’s for rent on Airbnb – Quartz

Patron Banyan House Edition

 

 

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“If in our daily life we can smile, if we can be peaceful and happy, not only we, but everyone will profit from it.  This is the most basic kind of peace work.”   That Hanh [Vietnamese Buddhist Monk]

Close your eyes and imagine a private place, away from all the stress and the mundane that can be in the every day routine. Imagine that place rests nestled around a lush Banyan tree and built by an expert in design and design comfort details. If you have visited Eliza Wierwight’s Patron house and Keiki House you have a taste of her designs. You cannot walk around her grounds and homes without realizing her creations are made of love. You can feel her considerations and thoughts in all aspects, from the smallest detail to the overall feelings and views. Even the music stream is perfectly fitted for the experience. [in footnotes]

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